Reading the Climate

As some of you know I have published two climate-fiction novels, Accidental Child and Providence. While I write fiction as a way of thinking deeply about climate issues, I read lots of non-fiction. Here’s a partial list of books that have enhanced my understanding of climate issues. Some of these books scare me, and that’s a good thing. We should be scared of what we are doing to the only environment we have.

Non-fiction Climate-literature

Bloomberg, Michael and Carl Pope. Climate of Hope: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet.

Weisman, Alan. The World Without Us.

Gelbspan, Ross.The Heat Is On.

Beg levy, Ed. Jr. Living Like Ed: A Guide to the Eco-Friendly Life.

Gleick, Peter. The World’s Water, 1998-1999.

Posted, Sandra. Pillar of Sand: Can the Irrigation Miracle Last?

Barlow, Maude. Blue Future: Protecting Water for People and the Planet Forever.

Schor, Juliet. Plenitude: Economics in an Age of Ecological Disaster.

Jones, Van. The Green Collar Economy.

Nordhous, Ted and Michael Shellenberger. Break Through: From the Death of Environmentalism to the Politics of Possibility.

Browser, Michael and Warren Leon. Consumer’s Guide to Effective Environmental Choices: Practical Advice from the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Terry, Beth. Plastic Free.

Rogers, Heather. Gone Tomorrow: The Hidden Life of Garbage.

Beavan, Colin. No Impact Man.

Stover, Bill. Heat: Adventures in the World’s Fiery Places.

Hermès, Edward. Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash.

Barnett, Cynthia. Rain: a Natural and Cultural History.

Donne & Goldman, Eds. His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Ecology, Ethics, and Interdependence.

Schwartz, Judith D. Water in Plain Sight: Hope for a Thirsty World.

I am happy to share this list and to hear from others who might recommend additional writers. Next blog post I intend to offer a list of climate-fiction reads, and there after a list of pertinent climate-related online selections. Let me know if this is useful.